Project Otaku

As my undergrad years came to a close, I found myself increasingly anxious about what life after college would entail. I knew few college educated people, and didn’t have the wherewithal to follow a career trajectory, although I resolved at some point to not pursue a Masters in Art History. The things I did have–a Bachelor of Arts, a senior thesis, and an anime blog–I didn’t know how to use beyond academia. I knew that I liked to learn, and I liked to write both creatively and scholastically. Where did that leave me?

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I eventually spoke with Erica, a pal of mine from GoBoiano, and we worked on what became Project Otaku: a website with a similar news aggregator/listicle/review function as GoBoiano, but on our own terms. This helped me through otherwise dark and depressing times, when the pressure of the real-world seemed insurmountable.

Once I went to graduate school and grew overwhelmed with its obligations, I departed from Project Otaku while Erica kept at it for some months afterward, until the domain and hosting expired. All of our work sank to the bottom of the digital sea…or so I thought.

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I was at work last week when I recalled “The Wayback Machine,” an archive of all things that had been captured in the internet. I searched for Projectotaku.com, and found several snapshots of what the website had been at particular timestamps. A lot of digging allowed me to reread work I was very proud of, including a series on anime shorts. I promptly copied this content and saved it onto my One Drive.

I’ll modify a page on this blog to include access to articles I’ve written during my blogosphere journeys. I don’t know what the value of my years of blogging and internet writing is, or how to market that to anyone. But I was here, a fanboy among many, and I enjoyed sharing content with dozens or hundreds, maybe even thousands of readers.

Jesus, this sounds like a last hurrah. It isn’t, not yet anyway.